Use Your Teen’s Passion To Get ‘Er Done

Waiting roomWhen we are passionate about something, we are motivated to do it. You love photography, so you find time to take pictures. You love football, so you are sure to watch the game every Sunday. Same goes for kids. They love art, so they find time to paint, or they can’t get enough of gymnastics, so they do the splits all over the house and rand-offs in the backyard.

The problem is, there are times when we need to do things we are NOT motivated to do: dump the trash, go to work, do our taxes. The same goes for kids: clean their room, do their homework, practice piano. To motivate the little ones, we can create a sticker chart or another visual way for them to see their progress.

Yet, teens aren’t always so easily persuaded with stickers on a poster. But that doesn’t mean we can’t use the same ideology that we use with our younger offspring. See, the sticker chart is a visual representation that shows our kids that they are reaching a certain goal. If they get ten stickers, they get an ice cream or if they fill out their chart, the family heads to the beach.

The chart doesn’t work if ice cream or the beach aren’t motivating. The motivation drives our children to get the job done when passion wanes. So, we need to do the same for our teens. What motivates them? Do they love graphic novels, but never do their homework, or slough off at their part time job, or never take the dog for a walk? You could dangle a dollar prize in front of them, but that lacks focus.

Tell your teen if he gets his homework in for the next two weeks, you’ll get him some art supplies to draw his own graphic novels, or if he gets a good report from his boss, you’ll take him to Comic-Con.

You need to find your teen’s passion to help him find success in what he’s not passionate about. Once you identify your teen’s passion, use that to motivate him and learn how to navigate through life’s less exciting, but necessary, essentials.

Written by: Leon Scott Baxter, The Dumbest Genius You’ll Ever Meet

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About the Author

Leon Scott Baxter, “America’s Romance Guru” and “The Dumbest Genius You’ll Ever Meet”, is the author of three books and his latest, “Secrets of Safety-Net Parenting” is due out by the end of 2014. He has been married to his college sweetheart for twenty-two years and is the father of two girls, eleven and fifteen.

He’s the founder of CouplesCommittedToLove.com and you can learn more about his take on parenting at SafetyNetters.com.

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Surviving Teenhood

Beautiful  thoughtful young woman, questionsThe primary goal of the teen years is to achieve independence. Other goals include: finding a way to fit in; thinking about a career choice; and for many just making it through high school. For the process of the primary goal to occur, teens will start pulling away from their parents. They will pull away from the parent they are closest to first. Although capable of making decisions, a number of teens are not ready for the adjustment. Maturity levels vary amongst teens.

At this stage in life, teens are responsible for their choices, and although a parent is in part to blame when a teen makes a mistake, the bottom line is you are still responsible. People will make quick assessments of you when you make mistakes. People will also make a quick assessment of you by your appearance. Appearance can serve as a clue to your character and upbringing. It can be confusing when the most colorful dressers come from good families. Appearance may also signal whether you are a troublemaker, what type of work ethic you have, if there is parental involvement, and whether you have solid morals or values. Today there is a general, but limited, acceptance of a teen’s unique appearance, offering an opportunity to redefine a youth’s unusual style as individual, positive exploration and a harmless search for identity.

More and more young adults strive to be successful, some by trying to be a better athlete; a better student; and yes, even a millionaire. Many of them started at a young age with little or no instructions, just a dream. They start with a desire to do or become something and they act upon it. The definition of success lies within the individual. Parental guidance is key.

With the proper strategies in place, your teen can do or become anything he wants. Are you ready to help your teen do what it takes to become successful? Are they prepared to overcome the roadblocks to achieve success?

The first step towards success is to have absolute belief and faith in your teen’s abilities. Rome was not built in one day, and their future will not be formed in one day. Taking each day one step at a time and formulating the right plan of action will help you in creating the life that you both desire. Everything around you begins as a thought. It’s time to put those thoughts into reality.

Think of what you deeply desire in your life or where you want to be a year from now. How about 10 or 20 years from now? What changes have to take place? What do you need to know or learn? What spiritual, emotional, personal, financial, social or physical properties need to be addressed? The clearer you are with each of these dimensions, the sharper your vision. The clearer you are, the easier it will be to focus on making it happen.

Teach your teen that knowing why you want to achieve your goals is powerful. Identify the purpose of your goal to help you instantly recognize why you want that particular goal and whether it’s worth working toward. Knowing why you want something furnishes powerful motivation to see it through to the finish.

Written by: Michele Sfakianos, Registered Nurse & Award-Winning Author

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About the Author

Michele is a registered nurse, award-winning author, leading authority on parenting, speaker and professional copywriter.

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The Importance of Teachable Moments

Cute siblings with their mother making biscuitsWhat a difficult life a teenager leads today. Are our teens forced to live on the edge at a superficial level with no acceptance and minimal positive affirmation from parents? Is the peer pressure too much? Are they learning to live from the Internet and television with no emphasis on moral values or excellence? Are you comfortable with your current parenting style? Or, do you need to tweak some things? Only you can answer these questions.

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